The Trump Revolution

Photo by Gage Skidmore

Photo by Gage Skidmore

The Trump Revolution

Ilana Mercer identifies its key components

In my new book, “The Trump Revolution: The Donald’s Creative Destruction Deconstructed,” I argue that Donald J. Trump is the quintessential post-constitutional candidate.

In the “Opening Statement,” titled “Welcome To The Post-Constitutional Jungle,” oldies will recognize a nod to the Guns N’ Roses classic, “Welcome to the Jungle,” as well as to broadcaster Mark Levin’s coinage.

We inhabit what Levin has termed a post-constitutional America. The libertarian (and classical conservative) ideal—where the chains that tether us to an increasingly tyrannical national government are loosened and power is devolved once again to the smaller units of society—is a long way away.

Where the law of the jungle prevails, the options are limited: do Americans get a benevolent authoritarian to undo the legacies of Barack Obama, George W. Bush and those who went before? Or, does the ill-defined entity called The People continue to submit to Demopublican diktats, past and present?

The quintessential post-constitutional candidate, Trump’s candidacy is for the age when the Constitution itself is unconstitutional. Like it or not, the original Constitution is a dead letter, having suffered decades of legislative, executive and judicial usurpation. The natural and common law traditions, once loadstars for lawmakers, have been buried under the rubble of legislation and statute. However much one shovels the muck of lawmaking aside, natural justice and the Founders’ original intent remain buried too deep to exhume. The Constitution has become just another thing on the list of items presidential candidates check when they con constituents.

The dissembling words of many a Republican presidential candidate notwithstanding—for most promise constitutionalism—a liberty-lover’s best hope is to see the legacy of the dictator who went before overturned for a period of time. The toss-up in the 2016 election is therefore between submitting to the Democrats’ war on whites, the wealthy and Wal-Mart; or being bedeviled by mainstream Republicans’ wars on the world: Russia, China, Assad and The Ayatollahs.

Or, suffering all the depredations listed and more if Candidate Clinton is victorious.

Thus the endorsement over the pages of “The Trump Revolution” is not necessarily for the policies of Trump, but for The Process of Trump.

Until such time when the individual is king again, and a decentralized Constitution that guarantees regional and individual autonomy has been restored—this process of creative destruction begun by Donald Trump is likely the best Americans can hope for. Put differently, in this age of unconstitutional government—Democratic and Republican—the best liberty lovers can look to is action and counteraction, force and counterforce in the service of liberty.

And a force of nature Mr. Trump has most certainly proven to be. You name it; Trump has tossed and gored it. The well-oiled elements that sustain and make the American political system cohere are suddenly in Brownian motion, oscillating like never before. An entrenched punditocracy, a self-anointed, meritless intelligentsia (which is not very intelligent and draws its financial sustenance from the political spoils system), oleaginous politicians, slick media, big money: they’ve all worked in tandem to advance a grand government—national and transnational—that aggrandizes its constituent elements, while diminishing those it’s supposed to serve. These political players have built the den of iniquity Trump is destroying.

Against these forces—RNC, NRO, NATO, a whole alphabet soup of acronyms that stand for statism—is Trump, acting as a political Samson that threatens to bring the house crashing down on its patrons. The hope expressed is that by drastically weakening The Machine’s moving parts—Trump might just help loosen the chains that bind each one of us to government.

Trump, the book argues, evinces the necessary moxie to blast away at an overweening political system. Who can deny that he has already done a laudable job of fumigating some serious snake pits? Undeterred, the Trump holy terror has even blasted the scold from Fort Vatican for living walled-off in Vatican City, while preaching to Americans that for their security needs, they must reject walls and “build bridges.” Pope Francis’ shopworn shibboleths, currently disgorged non-stop by candidate Clinton, are straight out of a Chinese, fortune-cookie wrapper. (Or a Deepak Chopra lecture.)

In a sense, Trump is coming from a libertarian angle: Government lives off the people. Government must, at the very least, serve the people. More laudably, Trump doesn’t collapse the distinction between “America” and the U.S. government. To the political cast, “America” is the U.S. government. To them, making America great means making government great. Trump exhibits no confusion of category. He doesn’t equate “America” with the U.S. government. To Trump, making America great means making the people great.

Understandably, The Donald has the political players rising on their hind legs in defense of their realm. And he has hitherto shattered the totems and taboos these players enforce. Debated as never before are vexations like immigration, Islam, and, yes, the legitimacy of the Republican National Committee.

In line with advancing a positive analysis of The Process that is Trump, a close reading of “The Trump Revolution” will reveal that matters of process are being underscored, such as the differences between political incentives in operation and apolitical incentives in operation: Trump’s.

Trump cannot be compared to a politician. While his Republican rivals were sponsored by super PAC puppet masters; Trump put-up and pledged to the American People a chunk of his life, his fortune and sacred honor. Other than his position statements over the years, Trump has no policy making past. In the nomenclature of law, one might say that Trump’s record is clean. The candidate has no political criminal record. (Come to think of it, El Chapo has a cleaner criminal record than the last two American presidents: he had fewer people killed.)

While “The Trump Revolution” deconstructs the evolution of the Political Trump, this book, at the same time, applauds The Donald’s destructive creativity. A masculine force at full tilt, Mr. Trump is creating new reality on the ground. The modest hope expressed in “The Trump Revolution” is that an utterly different political animal, Donald Trump, might actually do some good for the countrymen he evidently loves.

ILANA Mercer is the author of “The Trump Revolution: The Donald’s Creative Destruction Deconstructed” (June, 2016), and “Into The Cannibal’s Pot: Lessons for America From Post-Apartheid South Africa” (2011). She has been writing a popular, weekly, paleolibertarian column—begun in Canada—since 1999. Ilana’s online homes are www.IlanaMercer.com & www.BarelyABlog.com. Follow her on https://twitter.com/IlanaMercer

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ENDNOTES, 27th July 2016

Romney Marsh Landscape and Cloudscape, by Stuart Millson

Romney Marsh Landscape and Cloudscape, by Stuart Millson

ENDNOTES, 27th July 2016

In this edition: Three summer festivals – JAM on Romney Marsh * Mussorgsky’s Boris Godunov at the BBC Proms * Brass, Welsh voices and the Royal Philharmonic at St. David’s Hall, Cardiff

The lonely, low-lying landscape of Romney Marsh in Kent lends itself to a certain type of English music, and on Thursday 14th July The QR was present at the fine old mediaeval church of St. Nicholas, New Romney for a concert of Elgar, Peter Warlock, Vaughan Williams, Britten and the contemporary composer, Paul Mealor (b. 1975). Part of the JAM Festival (an acronym which stands for John Armitage Memorial) this concert, given by the London Mozart Players and the Mousai Singers conducted by Daniel Cook, attracted a large audience – clearly keen to hear the nationally – and internationally-acclaimed LMP and a world premiere Festival commission, Paul Mealor’s intense, reflective, yet uplifting choral-orchestral, The Shadows of War. A mass, dedicated to the memory of those who perished at the Somme a century ago (and dedicated to the Festival’s Edward Armitage and to Welsh conductor, Owain Arwel Hughes), the composer sets both the traditional liturgy and the words of poet, Dr. Grahame Davies. Continue reading

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The Problem of Hegemony

union jack

The Problem of Hegemony

Gerry Dorrian on The New European

“What first attracted you to the millionaire Paul Daniels?” Debbie McGhee, the magician’s wife, was famously asked by Mrs Merton, as played by the late Caroline Aherne. So famously, in fact, that her reply, “he wasn’t a millionaire when I met him,” has all but faded from public memory. But this is what leading statements do: they prompt the mind to form conclusions under the logical radar and are therefore immune to fact-based objections.

Shortly after the EU referendum, a new title appeared in newsagents, branding itself as “the new pop-up paper for the 48%”, this being the share of those who chose to Remain. The 48% are composed of a diverse range of people, just like the 52%. Continue reading

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Wedge Issue

Wedge Issue dining

Wedge Issue dining

Wedge Issue

91-95 Clerkenwell Road, London, EC1R 5BX 

Em Marshall-Luck enjoys a pizza

Situated almost opposite a house in which Benjamin Disraeli used to live, Wedge Issue is a trendy, hip young establishment at the slightly down-at-heels yet undoubtedly rising west end of Clerkenwell Road. It is fairly unobtrusive from the road – a paleish green exterior – the colour of which is continued inside, and a sign bearing the name and a distinctive logo. One enters into frenetic chaos and swirling smoke. Admittedly, we chose one of the busiest times to visit, on a Friday lunchtime when it was heaving with young office workers out for a quick but sociable lunch at long tables. The hot and stressed but friendly chap who greeted us at the door slightly panicked at the word “journalist” and rushed up and down the stairs several times, until he led us up and out of the frenzy to the balcony seating above. Continue reading

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Words of Wisdom, in a Time of Troubles

beheading

Words of Wisdom, in a Time of Troubles

Darrell Sutton reviews a new exegesis of Islam

Ira M. Lapidus, A History of Islamic Societies, 3rd ed. (Cambridge University Press, 2014), xxxvii, pp 979.

These are unhappy times. The dawning of each new day obliges us to brazen through perils. Incidents of a dreadful kind are multiplying. Nations are dealing with grief as a collective experience, and the mournful tones exhibited by residents on the international scene are more than a symbolic gesture: people are hurting and confused because merriment to-day is replaced by untold miseries. As these words are penned, I am once more accosted by grisly pictures on the television. Bodies lay strewn along the ground in a European country. The photographs of blood-soaked garments, dismembered or mangled cadavers, and tear-stained faces arouse questions in abundance. They are usually the same ones: ‘Who would do such a thing? How did this happen? Surely they must be mentally deranged, right? What kindles this sort of rage in the hearts of attackers? Why target us?’… Continue reading

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Overthrowing your Leader

Turkay coup

Overthrowing your Leader

Bill Hartley on how not to stage a coup

The recent coup attempt in Turkey reinforces the idea that the last people to be undertaking a military coup are the military. One might assume that soldiers have so much experience in planning that the phrase ‘military precision’ really means something. It might but it doesn’t seem to be a transferable skill. In fairness perhaps the one aspect of planning not taught in defence colleges is how to stage a coup. There may be good reasons for this because in certain countries it is a painful subject. Before the events in Turkey coups seemed to have fallen out of fashion, particularly among NATO members. The Spanish military has been behaving itself since 1981 and that rather operatic attempt by Lt Col Terejo to seize the Cortez. There was something comedic about a man wearing a tricorno headdress from the nineteenth century, trying to scare the legislature. Despite huge economic problems the Greek colonels, too, have remained in barracks. Continue reading

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The Idiocracy – Worse than Wahhabism?

Nice

The Idiocracy – Worse than Wahhabism?

ILANA MERCER decries an unholy alliance

They’ve been killing their way across Europe and the USA. They’re the Mohameds, Omars, Syeds, Tashfeens, Tareks, Maliks, Ibrahims, Brahim, Yassins, Rafiks, Khalids and Najims; Messrs. Abaaoud, Abdeslam, El Bakraouis, Abrinis, Abballas (blah-blah). But about them, the Twittersphere yields more plain spoken truths than the expert Idiocracy.

The latest Muslim immigrant to unleash himself on a battered France—“France’s terror log: 230+ killed in attacks since 2015, more than previous century of terrorism,” reports RT—was Tunisian-born Mohamed Lahouaiej Bouhlel.

Write his name down. The American media will soon proclaim sanctimoniously, as they did for Omar Mateen, that they’ll not be mentioning names. Wikipedia already minimizes a researcher’s exposure to the names of the Islamist terrorists who roamed free among us, opting for their professional affiliation: “ISIL supporters,” “suicide bomber,” visiting Moroccan student. Continue reading

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A Referendum and the Murder of an MP

 jo cox

A Referendum and the Murder of an MP

Gerry Dorrian condemns conflation

On Thursday June 16, 2016, the increasingly acrimonious campaigns to remain and leave the European Union in the next week’s referendum fell silent at the news that Jo Cox, a Labour MP and mother of two young children, had been killed, allegedly by one Thomas Mair, who was found to have a collection of neo-Nazi literature.

I have no desire to defend or to indict Mair. Rather, I wish to show that if he was a neo-Nazi – or was attracted to neo-Nazism because of his mental health problems – this does not of itself give an indication of his views regarding the EU. Continue reading

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America – Sick of Dog-Whistle Politics

George W Bush speaks in Dallas

George W Bush speaks in Dallas, YouTube.com

America – Sick of Dog-Whistle Politics

Ilana Mercer accuses the President of racial particularism

Just wait. In the fullness of time, Donald J. Trump will be blamed for “creating the atmosphere” that led to the Texas cop massacre of July 7.

However, at least by the same standards applied to Mr. Trump, Barrack Hussein Obama should be fingered for encouraging Micah Xavier Johnson to “shoot a dozen Dallas police officers, killing five.”

Is it unreasonable to conclude that the not-so-subaudible dog-whistle emitted by Obama, a day prior, must have reached mass murderer Johnson and might have spurred his actions? Continue reading

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Charlotte Brontë’s Governessy Effusion

Joan Fontaine as Jane Eyre

Joan Fontaine as Jane Eyre

Charlotte Brontë’s Governessy Effusion

Duke Maskell contemplates class and circumlocution

Good English is a class language, and that is its fatal defect. The English writer is a gentleman first and a writer second. (Raymond Chandler)

Or, if he is a writer first, what he only too often writes is a literary English, that is, language with no conceivable use outside a book. (Anon.)

Is it possible that a novel so long thought a classic as Jane Eyre should just be – tosh? A superior sort of tosh but tosh all the same? Could it possibly be true that Charlotte Brontë … can’t write? Continue reading

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